sophie howl's moving castle

sophie howl's moving castle
October 28, 2020

For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. I will forever keep her in mind as a perfect example of what not to do with my female characters. A protagonist is supposed to be a remarkable person who has remarkable qualities. He's talked to Lettie and Mrs. Fairfax about it, and he brought Sophie to Mrs. Pentstemmon to see if his old tutor could do anything to help Sophie. Of course, all good things must come to an end, and Sophie outgrows her curse by the conclusion of the novel. Sophie is a plain young woman who manages to be bored and discontent despite the fact that she lives in a beautiful steampunk world full of wizards and witches and magic. Sophie's lack of self-confidence is actually one of the reasons we like her so much: she has something personal to overcome, which is even more important than her external enemy, the Witch of the Waste. No. These blobs are the henchmen of the Witch of the Waste, a wicked sorceress who collects young men and is after Howl to be a part of her collection. Sophie's willpower (which is clearly very strong) has been keeping her old as long as she wanted the protection of the Witch's curse, but now she's willing to take a risk on herself and on Howl. But it pretty much seems that Sophie's one defining trait is the fact that she is not remarkable at all. But Sophie is a champion at avoiding things she doesn't want to think about. She's just been rescued by a handsome man -- like the typical damsel in distress, I might add -- and is now flustered and in love with him. Ironically enough, Sophie has silver hair for the duration of the film, and yet, she is the most mundane, boring, snooze-fest of a character to ever grace the plot of a science fantasy story. But it's also hard to take seriously when one of the main characters lacks any remotely interesting qualities whatsoever. Howl's Moving Castle (Book) The eldest of the Hatter sisters aged 18, she has red-gold hair and is rather pretty, although she doesn't perceive herself as such. On her way to see her prettier, more lively sister, Sophie is stopped by some soldiers in the alley, who take it upon themselves to sexually harass and terrorize her. Howl steps in just when things are looking bad for Sophie and forces the soldiers to march away with a flick of his powerful finger. No wonder Sophie and Howl make such a good pair, since they share a similar love of slithering out of things that make them uncomfortable. She looks dull, acts dull, and has no personality. It's usually a trait of a character who is special or magical in some way. Once she realizes that she has magic and that she loves Howl, Sophie gets frustrated with the restrictions on her life that the curse appears to have imposed. She's not brave enough to just ask him for help. Author: Ash. I'm not entirely sure why the handsome wizard, Howl, falls in love with her at first sight. Sophie seems uncomfortable fighting with her family, so she uses her new, cursed appearance as an excuse to avoid talking to them for oh, say, eighteen chapters out of twenty-one total. Straight to Howl. © 2020 Shmoop University Inc | All Rights Reserved | Privacy | Legal. It is up to the mother of their half-sister, Martha, to take care of them . It's Sophie's persistent love for him that eventually brings him out of his trance. Failure doesn't have to be a permanent, ongoing career choice, as Sophie seems to have imagined. She runs a hat shoo in her town along with her sisters and mother. The Witch of the Waste quickly realizes that Howl is in love with Sophie (for whatever f****** reason) and comes to Sophie's hat shop to appraise her. Howl manages to guide Sophie to safety by flying her over the rooftops. He then drops her off at her sister's, promising to lead the witch's henchmen away from her. This might make sense if she was running to him for help to cure her curse. On the way, it becomes clear that Howl had no choice but to escort Sophie, as stepping in to save her from the predatory soldiers had led his enemies right to her. In the beginning of the movie, her sister even accuses her of living for their dead father rather than herself. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Sophie is the eldest of the Hatter sisters and the heroine of Howl's Moving Castle. And once Sophie is ready to face her new, improved, more magical life again, she lets the curse drop. She's not clever enough to trick Howl into helping her. She is voiced by Emily Mortimer as a young woman and Jean Simmons as an old woman. She's tired of being separated from her family, and she seems ready to deal with her old life again, this time with more confidence and honesty than before. She and her sister Lettie are orphaned after the death of her father. Her solution is to become his domestic slave and live in his castle, serving him for the last few weeks of her elderly life. Wishing to be rid of the competition, she casts a spell on Sophie that turns her into an old woman. She admits later on that she was so frightened of the scarecrow partly because she wanted "a convenient excuse for not leaving the castle because she had really wanted to stay" (20.84). Sophie was perfectly willing to live a boring life slaving away in her father's hat shop because that was what he would have wanted. When I was a kid, I loved this film. Sophie Hatter from the anime Howl's Moving Castle. By entering your email address you agree to receive emails from Shmoop and verify that you are over the age of 13. Living up … By the end of the film, Sophie eventually becomes young again, but her hair remains silver. All of that meekness and mildness changes when the Witch of the Waste turns Sophie into an old woman. At last Howl has to conclude that Sophie, "liked being in disguise" (21.84). Sophie basically bullies her way into Howl's moving castle, making a place for herself as Howl's cleaning lady/assistant/companion in bickering. The animation, the magic, the characters -- I considered all of it superb. Ash has a bachelor's in English Lit. Howl's Moving Castle is the first novel in the series of books called the Howl Series. Michael warns Sophie that Howl "hates being pinned down to anything" (4.66), and Sophie accuses Howl directly of being a "slitherer-outer" who slithers "away from anything [Howl doesn't] like" (5.76). I'll admit, it's a nice little love story about how opposites attract at its core. Now as an adult, I feel too cynical and jaded to see the magic anymore. Sophie returns to her younger self just in time for a happy ending. She's a meek, fumbling slave to the will of men. Sophie basically bullies her way into Howl's moving castle, making a place for herself as Howl's cleaning lady/assistant/companion in bickering. Now I just see a silly story where the protagonist is sort of pathetic. Who wouldn't want that kind of freedom? Sophie uses her time as an old woman as a vacation from her old life, which gives her some much-needed perspective on her sisters, her stepmother, and what she wants to do with her future. Once she meets Howl, she becomes perfectly willing to slave away in Howl's moving castle because that's what Howl would want. This comment makes Sophie spitting mad, but it also makes a lot of sense to us: even at the start of the novel, Calcifer mentions that Sophie's curse isn't just from the Witch of the Waste, but that it has "two layers" (3.38). Once the Witch of the Waste turns Sophie into an old woman in the second chapter, it's like a switch has been flipped for her. He becomes stuck in the shape of a bird and can't change back. Sophie Hatter is our heroine, the daughter of a well-to-do hat shop owner in the village of Market Chipping in the fantasy land of Ingary. She's not brave, she's not smart, she's not resourceful. Once Howl arranges for Sophie to have a family reunion with her two sisters and her stepmother, and once Sophie manages to free Howl from his contract, Sophie lets go of the old age curse. Opposites attract and all that. Fanny Hatter, a.k.a. Sophie's time as an old woman teaches her that really terrible things can happen to you—you can suddenly find yourself ninety years old with no way of getting back at your attacker on your own—but you can still have a life afterward. Throughout the entire film, Sophie never learns to live for herself, instead always centering a man in her life and working herself to the bone for him -- even when he's dead. Because women fall in love with basic human decency??? Howl is apparently being chased by some black, gelatinous blobs. Howl is suddenly madly in love with her, because now she finally has something that makes her interesting and unique: her silver hair. Sophie believes that the youngest sister—in this case, Martha—always wins in this kind of story, and Sophie spends the bulk of Howl's Moving Castle learning to overcome her certainty that she was born a failure by being born first. Later on, Howl tells Sophie that he has tried repeatedly to break the Witch's old age curse. For a boring girl, Sophie does not seem like she will be the heroine. This series also includes Castle in the Air, published in 1990, and House of Many Ways, published in 2008. She's not resourceful enough to poke into his supplies and make her own cure. Sophie is smitten. Even when she's saving Howl's life, threatening Calcifer, or kissing turnips, Sophie still manages to be uninteresting and subservient. Her flexibility in bouncing back and making the best of her curse is reassuring, because it teaches Sophie (and us readers) that she is creative, lovable, and dependable—no matter what she looks like or what her birth order might be.

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