the trip to greece ending

the trip to greece ending
October 28, 2020

A great question, but it’s never answered. Variety and the Flying V logos are trademarks of Variety Media, LLC. Even today, Greece is a land of journeys, a fact underscored by how Brydon and Coogan are only there to dick around. Coogan said he imagines his onscreen character craving stability after the journey ends. Mikey Walsh is a staff writer at Nerdist. Now arriving at its fourth (and allegedly final) installment, Michael Winterbottom’s “The Trip” series has established Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan as one of the funniest comic duos this side of Laurel and Hardy, but these movies — for all of their dueling Michael Caine impressions and Michelin-delicious meals — have always been suffused with a deep and abiding sense of sadness. 'His House' Review: Remi Weekes' Thrilling Debut Sees the Immigrant Experience as a Horror Movie, 'Ham on Rye' Review: Like John Hughes on LSD, This Graduation Dramedy Has Surreal Vibes, Everything You Need to Know About 'Westworld' Season 3, Walt Disney Anticipated 'Ghostbusters' by 47 Years in 'Lonesome Ghosts'. “The Trip to Greece” marks the last stop on one of cinema’s most unlikely franchise journeys. What misconception might viewers of “The Trip” have about you? But ultimately in The Trip to Greece, they end up getting out of life what they put into it. In every “Trip” sequel, there are golden oldies — a touch of Pacino, a mumbled snippet of Tom Hardy — and at least one great new one, like the Dustin Hoffman-and-Laurence-Olivier-in-“Marathon-Man” set piece that’s the funniest sequence in “The Trip to Greece.” Yet as much as I adore these flashbacks to the ’70s, there’s a whole new world out there waiting to be mimicked into oblivion, and these are the guys to do it, even if Coogan now claims he couldn’t care less about being an impressionist. It’s a symbolic end to an era, and, ironically, The Trip series ultimately becomes more about two friends finding their way home. Instead of a laugh track, every punchline is followed by an existential twang of self-doubt. While nothing can top classic bits like Coogan’s eulogizing Brydon or Michael Caine’s changing voice, Greece does manage to add a couple numbers to the duo’s greatest hits. We can’t escape who we are and what we’ve done. In answer to that, I love to learn. Coogan: We live in a time where movie studios and broadcasters assume that the entire world has attention deficit disorder. That seemed like it might be the last we ever saw of “Steve Coogan,” but the boys are back for one last bite. “The Trip to Italy” repeated the same formula in a sunnier location, but ended on a stinging note of Rohmerian sadness. Coogan: Well, that’s true. “The Trip to Greece” wasn’t an ending, it was just a stop. Germany? That feels poetically correct. I’m a bigamist writer; I’ve got various partners. As a result, I think it’s finally time that Coogan and Brydon journeyed to the belly of the beast. Coogan: It gets confusing because sometimes I’ll say something in “The Trip'” which is a statement of fact and sometimes I’ll say something which is a bona fide lie. But there’s certainly a lot of truth in it as well. Each episode has been a touch bleaker than the last. Coogan: Maybe the human race can clean its act up. — a colorful combination of culture, comedy, camaraderie, and culinary exploration set in some of Europe’s most visually striking locales. In advance of the U.S. debut of “The Trip to Greece” on May 22, Coogan and Brydon spoke with Variety about why they’ve decided to give their passports a break and end the series, and how they’re weathering the coronavirus shutdown. But the movies are more than just travelogues. (The most hilarious was Michael Caine. Steve ends his story alone in the car. Rob’s story ends in his wife’s arms. “The Trip to Greece,” however, falls way too short of being the grand finale this series deserves. Coogan: The contemplative quality, that was a shock. 'Ham on Rye' Review: Like John Hughes on LSD, This Graduation Dramedy Has Surreal Vibes It’s kind of that old T.S. Fans won’t be happy to see “The Trip” saga hit the brakes, but at this rate the next installment would have been a Mike Leigh movie. This final film brings a bittersweet conclusion to their arcs that feels right. Director Michael Winterbottom says this is the final film. Coogan: Now that I’m getting older, I rail against acerbic cynicism and people who are self-consciously edgy. Ten years ago, they were two men who didn’t really like each other. I get emails from the odd friend about them. It’s as though both characters somehow know this will be their final time together. There’s a lot to see in such a limited space. Even some moderate conservatives will start to think that you need big government. I’ll write another Alan Partridge, too [a reference to his vain talk-show host character]. He knows that anyone watching this movie would happily pay to see Brydon and Coogan riff through their old bits for hours on end, but also that the series would become just as egocentric as its characters if it let our pleasure interfere with their mortal panic. We, along with Coogan and Brydon, deserve nothing less. Brydon: I wouldn’t need that Steve, because I wouldn’t want to see the show. And for an ending why not go back to the beginning. The pair swapped roles over the course of ten years, as Rob cheated on his wife in Italy and ran away to Spain to get away from his kids. It isn’t much of a spoiler to say that Brydon and Coogan arrive at their own definitions of home before all is said and done (though Brydon’s is invariably sweeter and less defined), even if the film doesn’t put too fine a point on how they’ve guided each other there. How have you been coping during quarantine? And where is that line in these two men’s souls, as they play themselves in a series of movies where every moment is “real” and every moment is a performance? Are there impressions that Steve does that you can’t do Rob and vice versa? The Trip series might best be described as a mash-up of an Anthony Bourdain special with Whose Line Is It Anyway? No doubt it’s been an unpredictable journey, full of beauty, tears, and silliness, such is The Trip to Greece and the very best of this series and this life. The film, which once again finds comedians Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon playing exaggerated versions of themselves, has all the familiar elements that gave the series its cult status in the U.S. 2010’s “The Trip,” in which Brydon and Coogan (playing ultra-narcissistic, compulsively performative versions of themselves) spent a week eating at northern England’s finest restaurants as part of an article the latter was assigned to write for a newspaper, was as heartsick as it was hilarious.

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